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Quest Research Notes

Mapping Your Course


1. Abstinence. Dictionary.com. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004.

2. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau; Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Community-Based Abstinence Education Program Announcement, 2008. pp 9-10.

3. Bramlett M.D. and Mosher W.D. Cohabitation, Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the United States. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Statistics 23 (22) 2002. pp 3,4.

Breaking Free


1. Media. Dictionary.com. Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc.

2. Entertainment. Dictionary.com. WordNet* 3.0. Princeton University.

3. Donald F. Roberts, Ph.D., Ulla G. Foehr, M.A., Victoria Rideout, M.A., Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8-18 year olds. March 2005. (While TV remains the most time consuming activity among teens at about 3 hours per day, between 1999 and 2004 rates of TV viewing and other forms of media were largely unchanged while computer and video game usage has doubled from 27 minutes per day to 56 minutes per day.)

4. Bruner, Kurt and Olivia, Playstation Nation: Protect Your Child from Video Game Addiction, Center Street, Nashville, 2006, pp 39-41, 44.

5. PBS Documentary. Frontline. The Merchants of Cool, www.pbs.org #FROL6909

6. Kastleman, Mark. The Drug of the New Millennium: The Science of How Internet Pornography Radically Alters the Human Brain and Body,Granite Publishing and Distribution, LLC Orem, Utah, pp173-185, 2001.

7. ABC News: Porn Profits: Corporate America's Secret, May 27, 2004.

8. Kastleman, Mark. Op. Cit. pp11-13, 242.

Finding Your Way


1. Detour. Dictionary.com. Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary. MICRA, Inc.

2. Albert, B. With One Voice: America’s Adults and Teens Sound Off About Teen Pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 2007. pp2, 17, 18 (Regret for ages 12-14: 67%, ages 12-19: 60%. Year after year, the “regret” statistic for ages 12-19 is consistently in the two-thirds range. 2002: 63%, 2003: 67%, 2004:66%).

Road Blocks


1. National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases definition of STDs as cited in: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau; Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Community-Based Abstinence Education Program Announcement, 2008. P. 10.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tracking the Hidden Epidemics 2000: Trends in STDs in the United States, Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000. pp8-24.

3. National Institutes of Health, Workshop Summary: Scientific Evidence On Condom Effectiveness for Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Prevention, June 12-13, 2000, Herndon, VA, July 20, 2001. ppi, 11.

4. The National Women’s Health Information Center, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women’s Health, Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Overview, May 2005. p1.

5. Hillard Weinstock, Stuart Berman and Willard Cates, Jr. Alan Guttmacher Institute. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among American Youth: Incidence and Prevalence Estimates, 2000. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health Volume 36, Number 1, January/ February 2004. p.1. (Study Summary of Results: Approximately 18.9 million new cases of STD occurred in 2000, of which 9.1 million (48%) were among person aged 15-24. Average daily cases overall is 51,780.)

6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Trends in Reportable Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the United States, 2004. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, November 2005. pp1-5.

7. Patel, Pragma M.D. Incidence of Types of Cancer among HIV-Infected Persons Compared with the General Population in the United States, 1992-2003. Annals of Internal Medicine, Volume 148, Number 10. May, 2008. p728.

8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2006. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Volume 55, August 4, 2006.

9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Genital Herpes Infection – CDC Fact Sheet, Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 4, 2008.

10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, STD Facts - STDs & Pregnancy, Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 4, 2008.

11. American Cancer Society, What are the key statistics for cervical cancer? October 31, 2005 (Cervical Cancer is in a declining trend. ACS estimates 11,070 cases of cervical cancer and 3,870 deaths from cervical cancer in 2008. Female deaths from AIDS were 4,128 in 2005).

12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Genital HPV Infection -- CDC Fact Sheet, Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, August 2006.

13. Centers for Disease Control, National Prevention INformation Network (NPIN), Fact Sheet: STDs Today. Rockville, MD. (http://www.cdcnpin.org/scripts/std/std.aspcdcnpin.org/scripts/std/std.asp) Accessed 4/11/09.

14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fact Sheet for Public Health Personnel: Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Condom Fact Sheet in Brief. (http://www.cdc.gov/condomeffectiveness/latex.htm and http://www.cdc.gov/condomeffectiveness/brief.html) Accessed 4/11/09.